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20130201
20130228
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KQED (PBS) 12
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
the hearing resumed, brennan defended u.s. actions in the war on terror, but he acknowledged the c.i.a. is not immune from scrutiny. >> i have publicly acknowledged that our fight against al queda and associated forces has sometimes involved the use of lethal force outside the hot battle field of afghanistan. accordingly it is understandable there is great interest in the legal basis as well as the thresholds, criteria, processes, procedures, approvals and review for such actions. i have strongly promoted such public discussion with the congress, and with the american people as i believe our system of government and our commitment to transparency demand nothing less. >> reporter: late wednesday, mr. obama directed that the house and senate intelligence committees be given a classified memo on drone strikes abroad. it lays out the legal rationale for targeting american terrorism suspects. brennan has helped manage the program. oregon democrat ron wyden had pressed for release of the memo. he went directly to the issue during his first pass at questioning brennan. >> what should be d
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
: still to come on the "newshour": china concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal w
community to curb the flow of arms into syria. another member of the u.s. senate has decided to step aside. republican mike johanns of nebraska announced today he will not seek a second term next year. in a statement, he said he wants to spend more time with his family, after spending 32 of his 62 years in various offices. johanns is the fifth senator to announce plans to retire next year. a hall of fame figure in pro basketball, former los angeles lakers owner jerry buss, died today. he'd battled cancer for months. buss ran the lakers for nearly 34 years, and they won ten n.b.a. championships during that time. along the way, he brought in star players from kareem abdul- jabbar to magic johnson to kobe bryant. he was also one of the first owners to create his own cable tv network, and sell the naming rights to his arena. jerry buss was 80 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to this weekend's protests and the big debate over the extension of an oil pipeline from canada into the u.s. as the u.s. tries to navigate between clean ene
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown every four months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense pro
to california, texas and florida. currently, just over half of the u.s. is affected by some form of drought, but that's down from last year. the u.s. chamber of commerce and the a.f.l.-c.i.o. have agreed on principles for a key part of immigration reform: letting in more lower-skilled workers. the two groups called today for a new worker visa program that makes it easier to hire foreign workers when americans are not available to fill jobs. the principles also envision a federal bureau to track labor market needs and shortages. the focus of the gun control debate shifted back to connecticut today. vice president biden attended a conference in danbury, just miles from sandy hook elementary school, where 26 people were killed last december. biden urged support for the administration's proposals to curb gun violence and he warned there is a moral price to pay for inaction. >> the president is absolutely determined, that the loudest voices will be for the voices of the people who lost their voice. they will be the loudest voices in this debate. we intend to speak for them; enough is enough. we
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
budget cuts. bernanke warned that sequestration will slow down the sluggish u.s. economy even further. bernanke said despite some positive economic improvements, the job market is weak. >> lengthy periods of unemployment and under employment can erode skills and the labor force or prevent young people from gaining skills and experience in the first place. developments significantly reduce their earnings in the longer term. >> until the job market improves significantly, the fed plans to keep the easy money policy going. >> chuck hagel will be the country's next secretary of defense. the senate voted a short time ago to confirm the former nebraska senator. suggesting hagel was too critical of israel. hagel succeeds leon panetta who is stepping down. >>> it may be the most important criminal procedure case in decades and the supreme court seems split right down the middle. the question, when and where is it appropriate for police to swab your cheek for dna? the high court heard oral arguments today. police should have sought a warrant before taking alonzo king's dna and running it th
the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop. if they are to survive. it's one of two american institutions in the news tonight for differing reasons in changing times. we want to begin tonight with nbc's tom costello in glen echo, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian, no secret the postal service is up to its neck in red ink, handling 30 billion fewer pieces of first class mail today than just four years ago. and guess what? delivery of packages booming because we're all buying stuff online. this action is about just trying to keep the lights on. for people all over america, like 71-year-old lois sexton in tennessee, that mailbox at the end of the driveway has been a reliable connection to the rest of the world. >> that's my communication with the people i have my retirement with, my social security. >> reporter: since 1863, six days a week, rain or shine, letters, bills, government checks, newspapers, even movies, have arrived, even on saturday. now the 21st century with its e-mail, e-cards and e-pay, has come knocking. >> we cannot put ou
's nothing on earth more mobile than capital and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income tax country. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in decades. >> because they're locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, t
's money to buy gold plated rolex's for high price celebrity memorabilia. today in u.s. district court, jesse jackson, jr., pleaded guilty to a count of conspiracy. bruce johnson joins us live from district court. bruce, you were there when jesse, jr., and his family left the courthouse. >> you were there. $750,000 in campaign contributions that he and his wife converted to their personal use. bring you the very latest. after saying there wouldn't be any comment, except from his defense attorney, in leaving the courthouse, we did get the former illinois congressman, jesse jackson, jr., to say a few things. we tried to get comment from his father, the reverend jesse jackson, the civil rights icon, the political guru, if you will, of the progressive democratic wing. this is what they had to say. the wife had more to say than the reverend, take a listen. >> what do you say? >> people in chicago. a quick message. >> not a proud day. i'm sorry i let everybody down. >> reverend, there has to be a message to people in chicago, given your family so much. >> a little later. >> well, do y
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)